Food

Vanilla Jell-O Pudding Soufflés

Soufflés are intimidating to most people.  For good reason.  All the things you’ve been told about them falling if someone so much as farts in the kitchen. 

First things first.  Yes, a soufflé will fall.  Eventually.  A soufflé will not fall from a loud noise or opening the oven or even a fart.  Soufflés are a pain in the ass at a restaurant because it’s all about timing.  The server has to be there to take it immediately because it does start to fall.  Not drastically and all of a sudden.  Calm yourself.

I used to work at a spot that did soufflés and they sold like crazy.  As long as the server was there to pick up the soufflé as it came out of the oven, we never had a problem or it falling or a guest complaint.

This is the same place where on a hectic night the girl I was working with misplaced the ice cream that went with the soufflé.  How you don’t put it back in the freezer is anyone’s guess, but?

After looking for the ice cream and arguing about where it could be.  We didn’t look in the obvious spot.  She put it back on top of the oven.  We laughed.  What else can you do at that point?  The soufflé still went out perfect.

I think soufflés get a bad reputation.  They are considered old school desserts and a pain in the ass to make.

Which honestly, if you don’t have a trained pastry person and waiters, they can be a pain in the ass.

I think if more people tried soufflés.  They would be on more menus and be more in demand.  They are classy and sophisticated desserts that can be made into multiple flavors.

Enough with the scary and intimidating mind set.

After getting asked A LOT about soufflés.  I wanted to simplify the recipe and clear the air.  Sorry about that.  I just wanted to prove that a soufflé won’t fall from a fart.

They are not that difficult and stressful as they’ve been made out to be.  They are not children.  They won’t make you think about where you went wrong in life.  You won’t regret making soufflés is what I’m saying.

A soufflé starts with a good strong base.  That’s where the Vanilla Jell-O Pudding Mix comes in.  Believe it or not, for me I use Jell-O Pudding mix in a lot of my recipes.  It has a great flavor, vanilla is getting ridiculously expensive and everyone that eats something made with Jell-O loves the flavor.  It has that memorable, growing up as kid flavor.  People always recognize the flavor but have that can’t put their finger on it reaction.  I love this.

I used vanilla because vanilla is always a good base for any soufflé and if you choose to use a fruit sorbet or flavored ice cream to pair with the soufflé.  Well, you can’t go wrong with vanilla.

The difficult part I would say to a soufflé, is the base to egg white ratio.  With this recipe, I use 4 egg whites for every 1/4 cup of vanilla base.  This will give you 4 – 8 ounce soufflés.  Perfect amount of soufflés for yourself.  If you have 3 friends to share with.  You’re doing better than me.

If you use more base per egg white will it not work?  No, it will still work.  You will just get more of a dense chewy almost more of a pudding consistency soufflé.  Not a bad thing, but we’re looking for more of a traditional airy soufflé.

Are you signed up for my Newsletter/Giveaways?  If you were, you’d realize that I’m giving away what I believe are the 6 Essential tools every pastry cook needs.  There is a spatula in there that you need to make the soufflés.  Thought you’d like to know.

Vanilla Jell-O Pudding Soufflés

Makes 4 – 8 ounce ramekins

Butter and sugar your ramekins, set aside on a sheet tray.  Set oven to 375 degrees.

The Vanilla Jell-O Pudding Base

1 cup         whole milk
1 package  Vanilla Jell-O Pudding Mix
1 whole egg

-combine the Jell-O Pudding mix and egg in a mixing bowl.  Whisk together and set aside.
-bring the milk to a boil in a sauce pan.
-once boiling, SLOWLY pour your milk into the egg mixture while whisking.
-turn the fire to a low heat and return the complete mixture back to the sauce pan.
-cook over low heat until mixture thickens.  About 5 minutes.
-pour into a container and let cool in the fridge

For the Soufflés

4 egg whites
2Tbsp  sugar
1/4 cup  vanilla base

-have your 1/4c of vanilla base in a separate bowl and set aside.
-combine whites and sugar in a mixing bowl.
-whip the mixture on high until mixture is still shiny and holds up.
-using a spatula, fold your egg whites into the base in two stages.
-portion the soufflé mix into your four ramekins and bake undisturbed for 10-15 minutes.

Gus says:
1. After you make the Jell-O Pudding base.  Lay plastic wrap over the top when you put it in the fridge.  This will prevent the ever so famous pudding skin.
2. Do not over whip your egg whites. Once they look shiny and standing up like whip cream. Stop. Otherwise, they will dry out, separate and fall and won’t be smooth.  Start over.  The addition of the sugar should prevent this from happening.
3. Very important. You must use the Cook & Serve Jell-O Pudding mix. The instant pudding mix won’t work.
4. Here’s a tip and a way to look fancy in front your three friends.  Take 1/2 cup of your vanilla base and thin it out with Grand Marnier.  Pour into your soufflés like anglaise right in front of them when serving. Just like at those upscale restaurants we can’t afford.  Look at you!!

 Related Recipes 

Easy Chocolate Mousse 

Vanilla Jell-O Pudding Buttercream

Baileys Pots de Creme

1 Comment

  1. Sherry Keeler says

    I’ve never had one but it looks yummy!

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